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Detail & Scale Books

Quick Links to Available Detail & Scale Series Publications.


Detail & Scale Series


F3H Demon in
Detail & Scale
**********F9F Cougar in Detail & Scale
Revised Edition

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F2H Banshee in
Detail & Scale, Pt. 1

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SBD Dauntless in
Detail & Scale

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F-102 Delta Dagger in Detail & Scale
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F4F & FM Wildcat in Detail & Scale
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F-8 & RF-8 Crusader in Detail & Scale
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F/A-18E &
F/A-18F Super Hornet in Detail & Scale

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F6F Hellcat
in Detail & Scale

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F-100 Super Sabre
in Detail & Scale

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Photo Galleries

Sopwith F.1 Camel Detail Photos:

 

This photo set includes photographs of the F.1 Camel on display at the National Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, Florida.  The aircraft is painted to represent an aircraft that was operated aboard the battleship USS TEXAS, BB-35, following World War I.  Of particular interest is the beautifully and accurately restored cockpit in this aircraft.

Detail & Scale and Bert Kinzey thank the Museum, and in particular, Hill Goodspeed, for providing access to this rare aircraft so that these photographs could be taken.

Click on the thumbnails at the left (below) to view a larger image.


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An overall view shows the F.1 Camel on display at the National Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, Florida.  It is painted and marked to represent a Camel that flew from the battleship USS TEXAS, BB-35, in 1919.  A large stuffed Snoopy, from the comic strip “Peanuts,” is placed in the cockpit, because of Snoopy’s imaginary exploits against the evil Red Barron in that strip.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The windscreen was a simple flat piece of glass positioned just in front of the cockpit.  The two .303-caliber machine guns are visible on top of the cowling, and the aft end of each extends back into the cockpit.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Here, the windscreen is shown again, and additional details of the two machine guns are visible.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The instrument panel was very basic. Notice that the altimeter has the word "HEIGHT" on it, rather than "ALTITUDE." (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Additional instruments and details can be seen in this view. Interesting items in the cockpit are the nice wood features as well as the wires and basic flying instruments. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The control column, typical of British designs of that day, the floor, and a multitude of cables are visible here. Note that the Camel did not have rudder pedals. Instead, there was a rudder stick with a place for the pilot to place his feet at each end. There were no brakes on the Camel. His feet rested on the metal part of the lower cowling. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details on the right side of the wooden cockpit are shown here. Note the adjustable bracing wires and where the input tube from the airspeed sensor enters the cockpit. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The left side of the cockpit is seen in this view. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The seat consisted of a lower cushion and a wrap-around back cushion over a weaved basket design. Note the fuel selector at the left front corner of the seat. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The 130-horsepower Clerget rotary engine had nine cylinders and turned a laminated wood propeller. Note also the two machine guns above the cowling. These had a synchronization mechanism to allow them to fire through the propeller arch without hitting the propeller. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The engine was enclosed by a metal cowling and forward fuselage section. A large oval-shaped access panel was on each side. Note also where the flying wires are attached to the fuselage and wing root. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Here is the right side of the cowling and forward fuselage and the propeller. There is only one exhaust port on this side, while the left side had two. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A wooden brace separated the two wheels with the wheels being attached to two angled metal axles. A V strut mounted each side of the main gear to the fuselage, and the entire gear assembly was braced by two diagonal wires. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Both the inside and outside of each wheel was covered by a metal plate. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details of the landing gear as seen from the left side are visible in this photograph. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Two holes in the upper fuselage provided access to the fuel system. This area is immediately aft of the cockpit. The one to the top right in the photo was the filler location, while the other is simply an access hole. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A step was located on the left side of the fuselage, just aft of the wing root, to allow the pilot to climb into the cockpit. Note again where one of the flying wires enters the wing near but not actually at the root. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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There was a hole in the upper wing just above the windscreen. Some of the flying wires that braced the center wing struts can also be seen in this view. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This device measured the airspeed and sent the data to the airspeed indicator in the cockpit. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A simple skid was used as the tail landing gear (or alighting gear as the British called it). The horizontal tail was braced by two flying wires above each side and two below. The cables that operated the elevators and rudder are also visible in this photograph. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A high view of the tail assembly shows the upper braces and the top elevator cable to good effect. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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From a lower angle, the two lower braces, the control cables for the elevator, and the right rudder cable are visible. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Our Most Recent Release!



F-100 Super Sabre in Detail & Scale

Detail & Scale Special Edition Books


U. S. Navy and Marine Carrier-Based Aircraft of World War II
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JET FIGHTERS
OF THE U. S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
PART 1: THE FIRST TEN YEARS
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Attack on Pearl Harbor, Japan Awakens a Sleeping Giant

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Colors & Markings Series


Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 1: Atlantic
Coast Squadrons
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Colors & Markings of the F-102
Delta Dagger

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Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 2: Pacific
Coast Squadrons

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