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Detail & Scale Books

Quick Links to Available Detail & Scale Series Publications.


Detail & Scale Series


F3H Demon in
Detail & Scale
**********F2H Banshee in
Detail & Scale, Pt. 1

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SBD Dauntless in
Detail & Scale

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F-102 Delta Dagger in Detail & Scale
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F4F & FM Wildcat in Detail & Scale
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F-8 & RF-8 Crusader in Detail & Scale

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Photo Galleries

SB2U Vindicator Historical Photos:

 

This photo set includes photos of a historical nature that illustrate the development and service of the SB2U scout-bomber.  They complement our Information File.  All are U. S. Navy official photographs and were taken from the files of the National Museum of Naval Aviation.

Click on the thumbnails at the left (below) to view a larger image.


Click image to enlarge

The XSB2U-1 prototype, BuNo. 9725, is shown from the right side.  Callouts indicate features unique to the prototype.  This aircraft was destroyed in a crash on August 30, 1936, which killed the pilot and the crewman.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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Folding wings for carrier operations were designed into the Navy’s first scout-bomber monoplane.  The large fabric areas of the wings are visible in this view of the XSB2U-1.  The aft fuselage and all control surfaces were also covered with fabric.  (U. S. Navy Photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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The first production version was the SB2U-1, and fifty-four examples of this variant were delivered to the Navy.  This one was assigned to VB-10 aboard USS SARAGOGA.  Callouts indicate visible changes as compared to the XSB2U-1 prototype.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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Another photograph of an SB2U-1 shows details of the pre-war markings used on these aircraft.  The tops of the wings were yellow with diagonal stripes of various colors and flat black walkways.  Markings were in black.  The fuselage was painted with silver dope, and the vertical tails were painted in colors that indicated carrier assignment.  In this case, SARATOGA’s color was white.  Note that this aircraft is carrying the 50-gallon fuel tank to extend range on the fuselage station.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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Click image to enlarge

 

The SB2U-2 was the second production version, and fifty-eight were produced.  Externally, the SB2U-2 was identical to the previous variant, and the only differences between the two involved minor equipment changes.  This SB2U-2 has a practice bomb dispenser beneath its left wing.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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Painted in the Blue-Gray over Light Gray scheme, this SB2U-2 is being prepared for hoisting aboard USS RANGER, CV-4.  Note the brace between the wing and the fuselage.  Turning the center section of the brace folded or extended the outer wing section as desired.  In this case, the wings are being folded just enough to allow the aircraft to be safely loaded aboard the carrier.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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An SB2U-2 from VS-42 is shown on the flight deck of USS RANGER.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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Although this photograph is not of high quality, it shows an SB2U-2 flying a neutrality patrol mission in a typical scouting configuration with two 100-pound bombs carried beneath the wings.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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The last SB2U-1 to come off the production line, BuNo. 0779, was completed as the XSB2U-3 floatplane.  Originally, it did not have the fin beneath the tail, but tests indicated that this was needed for stability with the floats in place.  It carried U. S. Navy markings during testing.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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The first SB2U-3, BuNo. 2044, was also completed and tested as a floatplane.  But by that time, the Navy’s perceived requirement for floatplanes had diminished, and it was converted to a standard landplane configuration.  All fifty-seven SB2U-3 were delivered as landplanes and were initially assigned to the U. S. Marine Corps.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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The SB2U-3 was a heavier version than the previous two variants, and it was intended for use by the Marine Corps.  It had a much larger internal fuel capacity, and the provision to carry an external fuel tank on the centerline station was eliminated.  Up to four .50-caliber machine guns could be fitted in the wings, but usually only one or two were carried.  The SB2U-3 was also the first variant to be called the Vindicator, but this name subsequently was applied to all versions.  This SB2U-3 was assigned to Marine Scouting Squadron 131, and was painted in the overall Light Gray scheme at the time this photograph was taken.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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Also painted in the overall Light Gray scheme, this Vindicator was assigned to VMS-3.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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The French ordered a modified version of the SB2U-2 which they designated the V-156-F.  Two orders of twenty aircraft each were delivered, and these saw some action against the Germans before France surrendered.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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The third order placed by the French was for fifty aircraft, but France surrendered before they could be delivered.  These fifty aircraft were modified as specified by the British and were delivered to England as V-156-B1s.  The British bestowed the name Chesapeake to the type.  They were used in various utility and secondary roles but were not used in combat.  (U. S. Navy photograph via the National Museum of Naval Aviation)

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Just Released!

JET FIGHTERS
OF THE U. S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
PART 1: THE FIRST TEN YEARS
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Detail & Scale Special Edition Books

U. S. Navy and Marine Carrier-Based Aircraft of World War II
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Attack on Pearl Harbor, Japan Awakens a Sleeping Giant

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Colors & Markings Series



Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 1: Atlantic
Coast Squadrons
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Colors & Markings of the F-102
Delta Dagger

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Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 2: Pacific
Coast Squadrons

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