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Photo Galleries

MiG-15 FAGOT, MiG-15UTI MIDGET:


AT THE WAR EAGLES AIR MUSEUM

This set contains detail photographs of the MiG-15UTI Midget at the War Eagles Air Museum in Santa Teresa, New Mexico. These photographs were taken by Bill Slatton and Bert Kinzey during two different visits to the museum. Most of the photos are in color, although a few are black and white. The War Eagles Air Museum has a truly outstanding collection of beautifully restored aircraft, and they have always been cooperative with Detail & Scale. Several of their aircraft have appeared in our Detail & Scale Series of books. We enthusiastically recommend this fine museum to everyone.

Click on the thumbnails at the left (below) to view a larger image.


An overall view into the front cockpit provides a look at the layout of the instrument panel and the control column. The gun sight has been removed and replaced by a box that looks like it might be used to hold modern U. S. radio communications and navigation gear. Note the arm attached to the canopy frame that holds the front canopy in the open position to the right. Unlike MiG-15 fighters, the Midget's windscreen does not have the thick center section of bulletproof glass. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Additional details of the instrument panel are revealed in this view. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Although taken at an angle, this close-up shows details of the individual instruments. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The floor in the front cockpit is seen here. Note the stirrups on the seat in which the pilot places his feet in the event of an ejection. The base of the control column is surrounded by a canvas boot. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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Details on the right side of the front cockpit are illustrated here. Note the line that takes defrosting and deicing air forward to the windscreen. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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As was common in Russian fighters, an electrical switch panel was at the forward end of the right side of the cockpit. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The throttle and engine controls were located on the left side of the cockpit. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The oxygen regulator and its associated lines were aft of the throttle on the left side of the cockpit. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The ejection seat was a very simple design with a headrest at the top. The seat was so unreliable that pilots often chose to do a crash landing than eject if it was at all possible. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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This is the area between the cockpits. Note the glass that provided limited protection for the crewman in the rear cockpit in the event of a canopy loss. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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A rear view of the same area between the cockpits again shows the protective glass as well as the back of the ejection seat in the front cockpit. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The panel in the rear cockpit has a full set of instruments. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The control column in the rear cockpit did not have the canvas boot as found in the front cockpit, and there were many more items on the floor. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The right side of the rear cockpit had both similarities and differences when compared to the front cockpit. Note the rail on which the rear canopy slid fore and aft. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Additional details on the right side of the rear cockpit are revealed from this angle. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The shoulder harness and lap belt on the rear ejection seat are a light tan with both painted and unpainted metal parts. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The Midget's unusual canopy arrangement is shown here from the left rear. The front canopy hinged to the right, and the rear canopy slid fore and aft on rails. The rear canopy had the look of a large parrot's beak at the aft end. Note also the red locking and unlocking handle for the canopies. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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This black and white photo looks up at the left side of the open front canopy and shows the grab bar that was used to open and close the canopy. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The windscreen and canopies are shown here from the right side. A bar, which extended from the windscreen to the center of the forward canopy's front rail, held the canopy in the open position. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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Note the red latching handle on the left front side of the rear canopy. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Looking through the glass of the rear canopy, the large, humped, center guide is visible. As the canopy slid forward, it rode up and over the hump then dropped forward and down into the closed position. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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A black and white photo shows the reinforcing plates that protected the forward fuselage and the nose gear door from the blast of the machine gun. On this aircraft the fairing is present, but the gun is not installed. Midgets usually carried only one machine gun, and it was located on the left side. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The speed brakes on the aft fuselage are like those used on single-seat MiG-15bis fighters. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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A top view of the left wing shows the two boundary layer fences. The red and white rod sticking out of the top of the wing is a mechanical indicator the pilot can see to insure that the gear is down and locked. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The same area is shown again from the outside. Note the cutout in the inner wing fence. This cutout was not on all MiG-15s, and when it was, it was only on the inner left fence. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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There were three attachment points for the external fuel tank along with the line through which the fuel passed from the tank into the wing. The filler point was on top of the tank just forward of the leading edge of the wing. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Although taken at an angle, this photograph provides a good look at the external tank under the left wing. Note the fins at the back of the tank. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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Details of the nose gear are shown here from the front. Note the green light on the forward part of the strut. The gear and the well are painted a medium gray. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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A black and white photo shows the very small wheel and relatively large tire used on the nose gear. The white antenna blade is a post-service add on. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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Details of the left main gear wheel and tire are shown in this close up. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The main gear has a shock absorber attached to the rear of the strut. Hydraulic lines for the brake are also visible in this view. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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An overall view of the left landing gear provides a look at the hydraulic link that retracts and extends the gear. Also shown are the two outer doors. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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The interior of the gear well, as well as the inside of the doors and the struts, are all painted a medium gray on this aircraft. The hydraulic link that operates the inner door is visible to the left in this photo. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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Like late MiG-15bis fighters, the MiG-15UTI Midget has a retractable landing and taxi light located just forward of the left gear well. Note also the small green navigation light further outboard. (Copyright photo by Bill Slatton)

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Just Released!

JET FIGHTERS
OF THE U. S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
PART 1: THE FIRST TEN YEARS
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Detail & Scale Special Edition Books

U. S. Navy and Marine Carrier-Based Aircraft of World War II
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Attack on Pearl Harbor, Japan Awakens a Sleeping Giant

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Colors & Markings Series



Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 1: Atlantic
Coast Squadrons
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Colors & Markings of the F-102
Delta Dagger

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Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 2: Pacific
Coast Squadrons

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