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Detail & Scale Books

Quick Links to Available Detail & Scale Series Publications.


Detail & Scale Series


F3H Demon in
Detail & Scale
**********F9F Cougar in Detail & Scale
Revised Edition

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F2H Banshee in
Detail & Scale, Pt. 1

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SBD Dauntless in
Detail & Scale

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F-102 Delta Dagger in Detail & Scale
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F4F & FM Wildcat in Detail & Scale
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F-8 & RF-8 Crusader in Detail & Scale
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F/A-18E &
F/A-18F Super Hornet in Detail & Scale

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F6F Hellcat
in Detail & Scale

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F-100 Super Sabre
in Detail & Scale

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Photo Galleries

F9C Sparrowhawk Detail Photos:

 

This set consists of thirty-two detail photographs of the F9C-2, BuNo. 9056, which is part of the collection of the National Air & Space Museum. All of these photographs were taken by Bert Kinzey when the aircraft was on loan to and displayed at the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Pensacola, Florida. It has since been returned to the National Air & Space Museum. The F9C-2 is beautifully and accurately restored. It is essentially complete except that the two cowl-mounted machine guns are not present.

Click on the thumbnails at the left (below) to view a larger image.


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A left front view provides a good look at the overall design of the F9C-2, and reveals the raised upper wing giving it a gull wing appearance.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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An overall view of the cockpit shows the arrangement of the instrument panel, control column, and rudder pedals.  The ammunition boxes for the two cowl-mounted machine guns can be seen beneath the instrument panel, however the guns are missing from this aircraft.  The holes for the aft end of the guns can be seen on either side of the upper instrument panel area.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details of the instruments are visible here.  Note also how the telescopic sight mounted through the center section of the windscreen.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Additional details of the instrument panel are revealed here in this photo taken from the opposite side of the cockpit.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The entire windscreen and telescopic sight are shown here.  Note how the center section of the windscreen is much thicker than the outer two sections.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The magnetic compass was actually mounted outside the cockpit under the upper left wing.  At the wing root, note the black hand hold used by the pilot to climb onto the aircraft and enter the cockpit.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details on the left side of the cockpit are shown here.  The black throttle quadrant was quite simple in design.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Electrical controls were on the right side of the cockpit.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This close-up shows the ammunition boxes.  Holes in the boxes allowed the pilot to see how many rounds were remaining, and numbers in hundreds were painted on the boxes to indicate the quantity for every other row of holes.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Beneath each rudder pedal was a metal plate that served as a foot rest.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The seat was a metal bucket design.  The padded headrest was part of the faring on top of the fuselage aft of the cockpit.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The Wright R-975-E3 Whirlwind was a single-row, nine-cylinder, radial engine.  It tuned a two-blade constant-speed propeller while producing a maximum of 438 horsepower.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This side view shows the close-fitting cowling.  Note how the back side of the propeller that was visible outside the diameter of the cowling was painted flat black to reduce glare for the pilot.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Each cylinder had its own exhaust stub rather than having a collector ring to route exhaust gasses to fewer exhaust ports.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The exhaust stubs and cowling are shown here from the left side.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A large panel on each side of the forward fuselage allowed access to the engine accessories.  This is the open panel on the right side.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details inside the left engine accessory access panel are revealed here.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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With the access panel closed, the forward right fuselage was clean except for a venturi tube just aft of the access panel door.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This view shows the left forward fuselage.  Note the attachment points for the rigging wires as well as the step area on the wing and step on the side of the fuselage.  The insignia used on the fuselages of the Sparrowhawks showed a large acrobat, representing the airship, ready to grasp a smaller acrobat, representing the fighter, while hanging from a trapeze.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This is the aft fuselage as shown from the right.  The attachment point for the tail hook is visible, but the hook itself was not installed when the aircraft was not being used aboard a carrier.  Note also that there is a boarding step on this side of the fuselage as well.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This is the left side of the aft fuselage.  Note the tube that ran through the aft fuselage just below the “U. S. NAVY” and just forward of the horizontal tail.  A bar could be passed through this tube and used as a hoist to left the tail of the aircraft.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The struts and braces for the main landing gear are illustrated here.  A thirty-gallon auxiliary fuel tank could be carried between the struts, and the fuel line for it is visible.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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An overall view of the left main landing gear shows how there was an aerodynamic skirt over the wheel, but the entire outer side of the wheel and tire was uncovered.  This allowed easy access, and the wheel and tire could be changed without removing the skirt.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This photograph provides a good look at the right main landing gear.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The upper and lower wings were braced with an “N” strut as well as a rigging that consisted of aerodynamic strips rather than more drag-producing wires.  Except for the upper surface of the top wing, which was yellow, the other fabric covered areas of the wing were painted with silver dope.  Careful examination of this photograph will reveal a red navigation light on the lower wing tip. (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The insignia under the lower left wing is shown here, and within the insignia is a white light.  Note also the black hand hold on the leading edge of the lower wing tip.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A floatation bag was mounted in each upper wing near the top.  In the event of a ditching at sea, the flotation bags would deploy and prevent the aircraft from sinking until it could be recovered.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This is the compartment for the flotation bag in the upper right wing.  Note also the pitot probe on the “N” strut.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The skyhook was simple but effective.  The long bar prevented the aircraft from getting too close to the trapeze, and a latch that could be controlled from the cockpit secured the trapeze into the hook.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Additional details of the skyhook are visible here, including the controls for the locking mechanism.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The design of both the vertical and horizontal tails was quite conventional.  The rudder and elevators consisted of a metal framework covered by fabric.  A white position light was at the top of the vertical stabilizer.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This left side view shows the tail section from a different angle and also provides a look at the tail landing gear.  Note a lack of any trim tabs on the control surfaces.  (Detail & Scale Copyright Photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Our Most Recent Release!



F-100 Super Sabre in Detail & Scale

Detail & Scale Special Edition Books


U. S. Navy and Marine Carrier-Based Aircraft of World War II
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JET FIGHTERS
OF THE U. S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
PART 1: THE FIRST TEN YEARS
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Attack on Pearl Harbor, Japan Awakens a Sleeping Giant

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Colors & Markings Series


Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 1: Atlantic
Coast Squadrons
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Colors & Markings of the F-102
Delta Dagger

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Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 2: Pacific
Coast Squadrons

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